Thursday, October 15, 2020

Reflection LuzDelMes: Human Ecology and Environment

 Human Ecology and Environment–Maritza M. Mejia - ©2020

Ecología Humana y Medio Ambiente – Maritza M. Mejia - ©2020 Leer artículo en español: http://luzdelmes.blogspot.com/2020/10/reflexion-luzdelmes-ecologia-humana.html

Humanity has had an evolution throughout its history. First, it was all about survival, cultivating its land, pastoring its flocks, and multiplying. Slowly, humans have matured to protect their offspring, surroundings, and wealth. The twentieth century’s industrialization and globalization, have expanded the scope of the continual evolution of humanity. Now, it is not about a single family or a single tribe, but it is about the world. Ironically, it continuous to be about survival. The interconnection still exist since the beginning of creation. Human ecology takes precedence over the natural environment and both need to be safeguarded to reach a balance and authentic human ecology.[1] 

The environment is our collective good and it is a challenge for the whole humanity to protect it.[2] “It is a matter of a common and universal duty that of respecting common good, destined for all.”[3] To understand the original divine mission to “work and care” for the home we live in (Genesis 2: 15), we need to be aware of our interconnection with each other, the planet and the environment. Moreover, we need an extraordinary force and virtue to understand it: love.[4] “If one member suffers, all suffer together; if one member is honored, all rejoice together.” (1 Corinthians 12:26). Furthermore, we must not disregard the “human environment”[5] which includes human life from birth to natural death.

In the book, Ten Green Commandments of Laudato Si’[6] by Father Joshtrom Isaac Kureethadam, he introduces fervent insights of the encyclical based on the principles of “Seeing-Judging-Acting” to reach ecological awareness and protect not only the environment, but also to care for humanity.  The Ten Green Commandments are:

1.     Take care of our common home.

2.     Listen to the cry of the poor.

3.     Rediscover a theological vision of the Natural world.

4.     Recognize that the abuse of creation is ecological sin.

5.     Acknowledge the human roots of the crisis of our common home.

6.     Develop an integral ecology.

7.     Learn a new way of dwelling in our common home.

8.     Educate towards ecological citizenship.

9.     Embrace an ecological Spirituality.

10.  Cultivate ecological virtues.

The Ten Green Commandments might be the beginning path for an ecological conversion. As I mention before, first we need to recognize there is an ecological problem and observe with a new vision. Then we can distinguish our wrong habits and change it with good practices, like the 3Rs: reduce, reuse and recycle. Ultimate, we can act and reach an ecological consciousness that lead us to an ecological conversion. 

 

 What is ecology? To begin with this analysis, first take a close look of the word “ecology.” It is derived from the ancient Greek words of “oikos” and “logos,” meaning “household,” or a “place to live.” The first person who uses this term was a German zoologist Ernst Haeckel in 1866. He applied the term as “oekologie” in the relation of the animal both to its organic as well as its inorganic environment.  Ecology is a science that deals with the interrelationships between the organism and its “environment.” [7] According to Professor Robert Leo Smith, ecology is also called “bioecology, bionomics, or environmental biology.” Ecology studies the sociological and political problems in human affairs, such as, pollution, global warming, food scarcities, extinctions of plants and animals. [8]

What is environment? The Online Encyclopedia Britannica, on the other hand, refers environment as the complex of physical, chemical, and biotic factors that act upon an organism or an ecological community and ultimately determine its form and survival.[9] The Merriam-Webster dictionary as the circumstances, objects, or conditions by which one is surrounded.[10]

Roderick J. Lawrence’s article “Human Ecology and Its Applications” explains that since the late 19th century the term “ecology” has been interpreted in diverse ways. In the natural sciences, for instance, botanists and zoologists often use the term “general ecology” to refer to the “interrelations between animals, plants and their direct surroundings.” [11] Human ecology sociologists suggest that it is the study of the “dynamic interrelationships between human populations and the physical, biotic, cultural and social characteristics of their environment and the biosphere.”[12] Human ecology can also be considered the environment relations which have a history in several scientific disciplines and professions. One aspect that is not considered in human ecology is the “anthropological dimensions of human customs, knowledge and values, as well as communication and information.”[13] Lawrence concludes that the term still remains divided between the “social and natural sciences,” as well as between the “theoretical and applied approaches” in each of these sciences.

In the book, “The Theological and Ecological Vision of Laudato Si’: Everything is Connected” by Vincent J. Miller we read one of the clearest vision regarding “human ecology.” First, Miller clarifies that is important to understand that integral ecology involves a belief based of the nature of the world that all things are interrelated. Second, it is important to have a special vision of integral ecology that requires a specific lens that allow us to perceive this “connectedness” with the Triune God. Third, an integral ecology beckons us to follow moral principles to preserve these interconnections.” [14].Dr. Miller concludes, in order to obtain a comprehensive ecology as a guide to action and moral principle, we need to trust, have the special vision and see the signs to reach consciousness to protect "our common home", as Pope Francis refers to planet Earth in the encyclical Laudato Si'.[15]

Human ecology takes precedence over the natural environment and both need to be safeguarded to reach a balance and authentic human ecology.


Maritza Martínez Mejía
Madre, Educadora, Autor Bilingüe, Promotora cultural y Traductora
Miembro de la ANLMI, FWA, SFWA, Delegada ANLMI
Ganadora del “Crystal Apple” 2006, “VCB Poetry” 2015, “Latino Book Awards” 2016,  “Author’s Talk Book Show” 2017. SOMOS Foundation -Poetry 2018

Actividades GRATIS de lectura y escritura en Website: 
www.luzdelmes.com 

[1] Pope Francis, Laudato Si’, 92

[2] Catholic Distance University, The Environment, accessed September 29, 2020. https://cdu.instructure.com/courses/1068/pages/the-environment?module_item_id=81603.

[3] The Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, 466

[4] Pope Benedict XVI, Caritas in Veritate, 1

[5] Pope John Paul II, Centesimus Annus, 38-39

[6] Kureethadam, Joshtrom Isaac, Ten Green Commandments of Laudato Si’, Saint John’s Abbey, Collegeville, Minnesota, Liturgical Press, February 18, 2019, 19-201

[7] Pimm, Stuart L, Ecology, Conservation Ecology Research Unit, Duke University, Durham, N.C., accessed September 10, 2020 https://www.britannica.com/science/ecology

[8] Smith, Robert Leo, Ecology, Professor of Wildlife Biology and Ecology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, accessed September 10, 2020 https://www.britannica.com/science/ecology

[9] The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica, Environment, accessed September 11, 2020 https://www.britannica.com/science/environment

[10] Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Environment, accessed September 11, 2020 https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/environment

[11] Lawrence, Roderick J, Human ecology and its applications, Centre for Human Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Elsevier Science Geneva, Switzerland, 2013, 31, accessed September 11, 2020 http://ssu.ac.ir/cms/fileadmin/user_upload/Daneshkadaha/dbehdasht/eko/pazoohesh/article_human_ecology/lawrence2003.pdf

[12] ibid. 31

[13] Ibid. 32

[14] Miller, Vincent J, The Theological and Ecological Vision of Laudato Si:’ Everything is Connected, edited by Vincent J. Miller, New York: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 1st Edition, July 27, 2017, 14-23

[15] Pope Francis, Laudato Si’,1-246



Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Día de las escritoras - Octubre 19

El Día de las Escritoras se celebra cada año el lunes más cercano a la festividad de Teresa de Jesús, 15 de Octubre, conocida como Santa Teresa de Ávila, lugar donde nació y reconocida como la primera Mujer Doctora de la Iglesia Católica y una de las más brillantes autoras españolas. 

Es un día, que pretende dar el valor, el espacio y el reconocimiento que merecen las escritoras españolas. Inicio desde el 2016. Cada lo se escoge un tema. El 2018 el lema fue: “Mujer, saber y poder, ” el 2019 fue “Mujer, amor y libertad y el 2020 será: Trabajo y mujer. Ver más en: https://clasicasymodernas.org/dia-de-las-escritoras-2020/

Es una iniciativa reciente promovida por la Biblioteca Nacional de España junto a la Federación Española de Mujeres Directivas, Ejecutivas, Profesionales y Empresarias (FEDEPE) y la Asociación Clásicas y Modernas que, desde el año 2016, "busca reivindicar la labor y el legado de las escritoras a lo largo de la historia a partir de la lectura de fragmentos representativos de sus obras", según mencionan las promotoras.

¿Quién es Santa Teresa de Jesús?
Nació en Ávila, España, el 28 de marzo de 1515. Fue la fundadora de las Carmelitas Descalzas. Por orden expresa de sus superiores Santa Teresa escribió su autobiografía titulada "El libro de la vida"; "El libro de las Moradas" o Castillo interior; texto importantísimo para poder llegar a la vida mística. Y "Las fundaciones: o historia de cómo fue creciendo su comunidad. Estas obras las escribió en medio de mareos y dolores de cabeza. Va narrando con claridad impresionante sus experiencias espirituales. Tenía pocos libros para consultar y no había hecho estudios especiales. Sin embrago sus escritos son considerados como textos clásicos en la literatura española y se han vuelto famosos en todo el mundo. Santa Teresa murió el 4 de octubre de 1582 y la enterraron hasta el 15 de octubre.  
¿Por qué esto? Porque en ese día empezó a regir el cambio del calendario,  cuando el Papa añadió 10 días al almanaque para corregir un error de cálculo en el mismo que llevaba arrastrándose ya por años.
                                          Mi oración preferida la Santa es: 
 ~Santa Teresa de Jesús ~

"Nada te turbe, nada te espante. 
Todo se pasa. Dios no se muda. 
La paciencia todo lo alcanza. 
Quien a Dios tiene, 
nada le falta. 
Sólo Dios basta." 

Maritza Martínez Mejía
Madre, Educadora, Autor Bilingüe, Promotora cultural y Traductora
Miembro de la ANLMI, FWA, SFWA, Delegada ANLMI
Ganadora del “Crystal Apple” 2006, “VCB Poetry” 2015, “Latino Book Awards” 2016,  “Author’s Talk Book Show” 2017. SOMOS Foundation -Poetry 2018

Actividades GRATIS de lectura y escritura en Website: 
www.luzdelmes.com 

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Reflexión LuzDelMes: Ecología Humana y Medio Ambiente

Ecología Humana y Medio Ambiente– Maritza M. Mejia - ©2020

 

Human Ecology and Environment– Maritza M. Mejia - ©2020

Read article in ENGLISH http://luzdelmes.blogspot.com/2020/10/reflection-luzdelmes-human-ecology-and.html

La humanidad ha tenido una evolución a lo largo de su historia. Primero, se trataba de sobrevivir, cultivar su tierra, pastorear sus rebaños y multiplicarse. Poco a poco, los humanos han madurado para proteger a sus crías, su entorno y su riqueza. La industrialización y la globalización del siglo XX han ampliado el alcance de la continua evolución de la humanidad. Ahora, no se trata de una sola familia o una sola tribu, pero se trata del mundo. Irónicamente, se trata de sobrevivir. La interconexión sigue existiendo desde el comienzo de la creación. La ecología humana tiene prioridad sobre el medio natural y ambos necesitan ser salvaguardados para alcanzar un equilibrio y una auténtica ecología humana. [1]

El medio ambiente es nuestro bien colectivo y es un desafío para toda la humanidad protegerlo.[2] "Es una cuestión de un deber común y universal el de respetar el bien común, destinado a todos."[3]  Para entender la misión divina original de "trabajar y cuidar" el hogar en el que vivimos (Génesis 2:15), debemos ser conscientes de nuestra interconexión entre nosotros, el planeta y el medio ambiente. Más aun, necesitamos una fuerza y una virtud extraordinarias para entenderlo: el amor.[4]   "Si un miembro sufre, todos sufren juntos; si un miembro es honrado, todos se regocijan juntos". (1 Corintios 12:26). Además, no debemos olvidar el "entorno humano" que incluye la vida humana desde el nacimiento hasta la muerte natural.

En el libro, “Ten Green Commandments of Laudato Si'” [5] del Padre Joshtrom Isaac Kureethadam, presenta fervientes ideas de la encíclica Laudato Si’[6] basadas en los principios de "Ver-Juzgar-Actuar" para alcanzar la conciencia ecológica y proteger no sólo el medio ambiente, sino también para cuidar de la humanidad. Los Diez Mandamientos Verdes son:

1.     Cuida de nuestra casa común.  

2.     Escucha el grito de los pobres.  

3.     Redescubre una visión teológica del mundo natural. 

4.     Reconoce que el abuso de la creación es pecado ecológico. 

5.     Reconoce las raíces humanas de la crisis de nuestra casa común. 

6.     Desarrolla una ecología integral. 

7.     Aprende una nueva forma de morar en nuestra casa común. 

8.     Educa hacia la ciudadanía ecológica. 

9.     Abraza una Espiritualidad ecológica. 

10.   Cultiva virtudes ecológicas.

Los Diez Mandamientos Verdes podrían ser el camino inicial para una conversión ecológica. Primero tenemos que reconocer que hay un problema ecológico y observar con una nueva visión. Entonces podemos distinguir nuestros hábitos equivocados y cambiarlos con buenas prácticas, como los 3R: reducir, reutilizar y reciclar. Lo último, podemos actuar y alcanzar una conciencia ecológica que nos lleve a una conversión ecológica.

    ¿Qué es ecología? Para empezar a analizar estos conceptos, miremos el significado de ecología. Se deriva de las antiguas palabras griegas de "oikos" y "logos", que significa "hogar", o un "lugar para vivir". La primera persona que utiliza este término fue un zoólogo alemán Ernst Haeckel en 1866. Aplicó el término "oekologie" en la relación del animal tanto a su entorno orgánico como inorgánico.  La ecología es una ciencia que se ocupa de las interrelaciones entre el organismo y su "medio ambiente".[7] Según el profesor Robert Leo Smith, la ecología también se denomina "bioecología, bionómica o biología ambiental". La ecología estudia los problemas sociológicos y políticos en los asuntos humanos, como la contaminación, el calentamiento global, las carencias alimentarias, las extinciones de plantas y animales.[8]

    ¿Qué es el medio ambiente? La Enciclopedia Británica se refiere al medio ambiente como el complejo de factores físicos, químicos y bióticos que actúan sobre un organismo o una comunidad ecológica y, en última instancia, determinan su forma y supervivencia.[9] El diccionario Merriam-Webster como las circunstancias, objetos o condiciones por las que uno está rodeado. [10]

En el artículo de Roderick J. Lawrence "Human Ecology and Its Applications" explica que desde finales del siglo XIX el término "ecología" ha sido interpretado de diversas maneras. En las ciencias naturales, por ejemplo, los botánicos y zoólogos a menudo utilizan el término "ecología general" para referirse a las "interrelaciones entre animales, plantas y su entorno directo".[11]   Los sociólogos de la ecología humana sugieren que es el estudio de las "interrelaciones dinámicas entre las poblaciones humanas y las características físicas, bióticas, culturales y sociales de su entorno y la biosfera”.[12]La ecología humana también puede considerarse las relaciones ambientales que tienen una historia en varias disciplinas y profesiones científicas. Un aspecto que no se considera en la ecología humana es las "dimensiones antropológicas de las costumbres, el conocimiento y los valores humanos, así como la comunicación y la información".[13] Lawrence concluye que el término sigue dividido entre las "ciencias sociales y naturales", así como entre los "enfoques teóricos y aplicados" en cada una de estas ciencias.

En el libro, “La visión teológica y ecológica de Laudato Si': Todo está conectado” por Vincent J. Miller, leemos una de las visiones más claras con respecto a la "ecología humana". En primer lugar, Miller aclara que es importante entender que la ecología integral implica una creencia basada en la naturaleza del mundo de que todas las cosas están interrelacionadas. En segundo lugar, es importante tener una visión especial de la ecología integral que requiera un lente específico que nos permita percibir esta "conexión" con el Dios Trino. En tercer lugar, una ecología integral nos invita a seguir los principios morales para preservar estas interconexiones".[14] El Dr. Miller concluye, para obtener una ecología integral como guía para la acción y el principio moral, necesitamos confiar, tener la visión especial y ver las señales para llegar a la conciencia para proteger "nuestra casa común", como el Papa Francisco se refiere al planeta Tierra en la encíclica Laudato Si’.[15] 

La ecología humana tiene prioridad sobre el medio natural y ambos necesitan ser salvaguardados para alcanzar un equilibrio y una auténtica ecología humana.

Maritza Martínez Mejía
Madre, Educadora, Autor Bilingüe, Promotora cultural y Traductora
Miembro de la ANLMI, FWA, SFWA, Delegada ANLMI
Ganadora del “Crystal Apple” 2006, “VCB Poetry” 2015, “Latino Book Awards” 2016,  “Author’s Talk Book Show” 2017. SOMOS Foundation -Poetry 2018

Actividades GRATIS de lectura y escritura en Website: 
www.luzdelmes.com

[1] Mejia, Maritza M., Human Ecology and Environment, compendio traducido al español 2020

[2] Catholic Distance University, The Environment, accessed September 29, 2020.  https://cdu.instructure.com/courses/1068/pages/the-environment?module_item_id=81603

[3] The Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, 466

[4] Pope Benedict XVI, Caritas in Veritate, 1

[5] Kureethadam, Joshtrom Isaac, Ten Green Commandments of Laudato Si’, Saint John’s Abbey, Collegeville, Minnesota, Liturgical Press, February 18, 2019, 19-201

[6] Pope Francis, Laudato Si’,1

[7] Pimm, Stuart L, Ecology, Conservation Ecology Research Unit, Duke University, Durham, N.C., accessed September 25, 2020 https://www.britannica.com/science/ecology

[8] Smith, Robert Leo, Ecology, Professor of Wildlife Biology and Ecology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, accessed October 2, 2020 https://www.britannica.com/science/ecology

[9] The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica, Environment, accessed September 29, 2020 https://www.britannica.com/science/environment

[10] Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Environment, accessed September 29, 2020 https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/environment

[11] Lawrence, Roderick J, Human ecology and its applications, Centre for Human Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Elsevier Science Geneva, Switzerland, 2013, 31, accessed September 25, 2020 http://ssu.ac.ir/cms/fileadmin/user_upload/Daneshkadaha/dbehdasht/eko/pazoohesh/article_human_ecology/lawrence2003.pdf, 31

[12] Ibid. 31

[13] Ibid.32

[14] Miller, Vincent J, The Theological and Ecological Vision of Laudato Si:’ Everything is Connected, edited by Vincent J. Miller, New York: Bloomsbury T & T Clark, 1st Edition, July 27, 2017, 14-23

[15] Pope Francis, Laudato Si’,1-246