Friday, June 3, 2016

30 Days of Ramadan: Understanding our Muslim Friends


Celebrate Ramadan:
 June 6th -July 5th, 2016
May 26th - June 24th, 2017

30 Days of Ramadan: Understanding Our Muslim Friends is a celebration
of children’s literature that includes characters and story-lines that celebrate being Muslim.

During the event, articles and blog posts about
the various ways to celebrate Ramadan will be shared by Muslim authors, illustrators, and publishers via social media, using the event
hashtag #30DaysRamadan

For more details, visit: http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com/30-days-of-ramadan-understanding-our-muslim-friends-link-up/


Books for Children:

My favorite's and reviews:

I'm not Muslim but admire the Ramadan practice of prayer and fasting, similar to the 40 days of Lent, but there is a big difference: Compromise to do it! A good examples is:

A Party in Ramadan (2009) by Asma Mobin-Uddin and illustrated by Laura Jacobsen. Leena faces a dilemma: she has promised to fast for the first Friday of Ramadan but she has received an invitation to a classmate's birthday party. What do you think she is going to do?

The Best Eid Ever (2007) by Asma Mobin-Uddin and illustrated by Laura Jacobsen. Aneesa is disappointed to be celebrating Eid al-Adha without her parents, but she learns an important lesson about the importance of Eid.

Going to Mecca  (2012) by Na'ima B. Robert and illustrated by Valentina Cavallini. With lovely illustrations join the pilgrims on each step to Mecca.

The White Nights of Ramadan (2008) by Maha Addasi and illustrated by Ned Gannon. Set during the middle of the month of Ramadan. Noor is looking forward to celebrating with her neighbors.

Time to Pray (2010) by Maha Addasi, translated by Nuha Albitar, and illustrated by Ned Gannon. In this tender bilingual book, young Yasmin is visiting her grandmother in a Muslim country where she asks her grandmother to teach her to pray. This book include explanations about the Five Muslim Prayers.

30 days of Ramadan Activity:
Photo credits: https://muslimlearninggarden.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/ramadan-good-deed-tre

1. Create a cardboard tree – Brown paper.
2. Trace leaves and cut them – Green or Yellow paper
3. Every time your children does something good, glue a leave on the trunk tree.



Ramadan Karem!



Maritza Martínez Mejía
Website: http://www.luzdelmes.com